Unholy Nation

Judge me, O God, and distinguish my cause from the nation that is not holy: deliver me from the unjust and deceitful man.

Soon.

I’ll be back to this soon. I hope. The summer economy is absorbing all of my time.

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Where have you been?

We’re busy here at Unholy Nation headquarters.   Since it is the summer time and the HQ is in a resort town, it’s hard to keep up with posts while trying to take a bite out of the summer economy.

We’re hoping to get back into the swing of things soon.

 

 

RE: Huh?

I forgot that it is accepted that you can be multiple things at the same time. The principle of non-contradiction? What’s that?

By be I mean 21st century relativist be not the ontological be that we are all used to.

The reality is you call yourself all kinds of things. 

All because you call yourself a/an _______ it doesn’t make you a/an_____________.

I’m a millionaire.

See, it doesn’t work like that.

Huh?

According to newsworks.org:

According to Delaware Online, “Ashley and Krein will exchange vows at the same church where she was baptized, St. Joseph on the Brandywine, in a joint Jewish-Catholic ceremony. It will be followed by a reception at the Biden residence in Greenville.”

A joint Jewish-Catholic ceremony?

Is this the type of ecumenism that the council wanted?

Just a thought.

I wouldn’t know where to begin other than saying:

“That doesn’t seem right.”

I was going to say it doesn’t seem kosher, but my religious idiom machine broke and the replacement part is on back order.

 

Hans Kung

Rorate has an interesting piece on Hans Kung entitled “Freak extremes meet.”

What Does it Mean to be Catholic in the 21st Century?

That question is important.

When Holy Days of Obligation are pushed to Sundays we effectively become less Catholic. Pushing all of our liturgical obligations to Sunday is said to be a decision out of modern convenience.

The Faith should not be convenient.

If you have a crucifix nearby–look at it and ask yourself if it looks convenient.

The reality is that there are multiple things that are making the Church less like her true self and much less than she is supposed to be.

The Protestantization of the Church is palpable.

The world wants our faith to be amorphous, pluralistic, and convenient.

Being less Catholic (so to speak) is not the answer to any of the crises facing the Church at this hour in history.

We can’t solve out catechetical crisis by making the teaching of the Truth obscure.

Truth is the light–it’s not the shadow.

We are given a clear message about the role of Jesus Christ, God the Father, and the Holy Spirit.

There aren’t multiple Christs, multiple Fathers, and there is of course no new-age mother sophia business.

By being faithful Catholics we are called to bear sufferings. Living the Faith is not convenient and it is not supposed to be convenient. By reducing our liturgical observations to mere pseudo-reverent “activities” there is not only a loss of meaning, but a loss of identity, and a loss of faith.

There are Catholics today who do not know the Church as they should. Because of this, there is a spirit of rebellion when the church re-affirms her teachings.

Catholics rebel against the Church because they are looking at her with the eyes of the world and not with the eyes of the Truth.

The answer is clear.

We need to be Catholic.

This has been the answer for every century.

The answer for the future of the Church is not to be found in an ecumenical Bible study. It’s not to be found in failed doctrines. It’s not to be found in yoga spirituality. It’s not to be found in heretical hymns.  It’s not to be found in esoteric homilies.

The answer is found in Christ and the fullness of Tradition of His Holy Church.

The Truth is there for the taking.

With our technology and access to centuries of robust teachings, the 21st century has no excuse to lurk in the shadows. If you look close enough, the message of Be Catholic has been echoed throughout history.

The answer is (as they say) in the question.

BE CATHOLIC.

Marty Haugen’s Liturgical Dance Party

I don’t understand why Marty Haugen’s music (?) is still being used by any Roman Catholic parish.

Maybe I’ll write more about this later.

Yet, I will say that is strange to sing a song to nature after the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.

There is a connection between bad liturgical music and the crisis in the Church. It almost reminds me of some Haugen lyrics:

“They blow where they will. They blow where they please.”

Those of course, are the winds that blow to please the Lord in Haugen’s “Canticle of the Sun.” Sounds relativistic.  Unholy Nation’s Board of Heretical Hymns suggests that what he’s really talking about are the winds of progressive Catholicism. We also can’t call hymnals “hymnals” because it contains the sound “him”–therefore, we must refer to them as “music issues.” The irony behind that label is that the music contained inside actually has issues.

Unfortunately, we all know where the story ends.

Some folks don’t understand that our missalettes reflect our faith.

We can’t have Catholic covers and Protestant innards.

Sancta Caecilia, ora pro nobis!

What’s More Valuable?

In some recent Delaware news, a woman has been charged with three felony counts of animal cruelty for storming into another woman’s house and squeezing some kittens to death. You can read the details at WGMD’s website.

(WGMD is a local radio station in lower Delaware. Based on their site, I like to call them We Got Mugshots Daily.)

According to GMD (that’s how the locals refer to it), the kitty squeeze was fueled by a feud over some prescription drugs.

Of course, the thought of someone squeezing fluffy’s offspring is awful. It’s normal to feel uneasy about this story; nobody likes animal abuse.

A Delaware News Urinal headline states that the big squeeze was “an unconscionable and shocking act.”

You can see the headline here:

It’s strange that our media sees cat squeezing as being so offensive. In a world where there is so much yuck going on, it’s the kitten squeeze that really hits to the heart. Forget the African church bombings, because there’s a new cat in town.

But you dare not say that abortion is an offensive and shocking act. Oh no you must not be insensitive.

“Well you know, the kittens were viable and they are cute and we love our pets more than our own kids because–well– aren’t they just precious. My fluffy is going to take over the whole kitten kingdom. Wait until later when I dress him up like a little pageant queen; it’s going to be so precious. And after that we’re going to sit down to a nice game of pinochle. Who says it’s only the dogs who like to play cards?”

It’s sad that animal rights don’t extend to humans.

Some folks have a questionable understanding of ontological value.

I’ll give you a primer.

Human (from conception) GREATER THAN any type of cat, small, large, or imagined.

That’s right Garfield; I went there.

This

Surely there are norms to purify the area (that aren’t dramatized above), but regardless this video sums thing up about CITH.

Benedict XVI’s May 2nd Audience

In our catechesis on Christian prayer, we now consider the speech which Saint Stephen, the first martyr, delivered before his death.  Stephen’s words are clearly grounded in a prayerful re-reading of the Christ event in the light of God’s word.  Accused of saying that Jesus would destroy the Temple and the customs handed down by Moses, Stephen responds by presenting Jesus as the Righteous One proclaimed by the prophets, in whom God has become present to humanity in a unique and definitive way.  As the Son of God made man, Jesus is himself the true temple of God in the world; by his death for our sins and his rising to new life, he has now become the definitive “place” where true worship is offered to God.  Stephen’s witness to Christ, nourished by prayer, culminates in his martyrdom.  By his intercession and example may we learn daily to unite prayer, contemplation of Christ and reflection on God’s word.  In this way we will appreciate more deeply God’s saving plan, and make Christ truly the Lord of our lives.

 

You can come to your own conclusions. Just remember some of the themes in his Holy Week addresses and his April 18th general audience.

That’s right. I linked to an older post.